Results tagged ‘ Eric Avilia ’

Prospect Recap: Part X

Borderline Infield Prospects (Grade C-)

Carlos Paulino: The Pirates acquired Paulino from the Marlins before the start of the 2011 season in exchange for Jim Negrych. In three years in the Marlins organization Paulino had established himself as a solid defensive catcher with a lot of questions surrounding his bat. He had a good offensive season in rookie ball in 2009 but was awful for the Marlins in A ball during the 2010 season. The Pirates still pushed Paulino up a level after acquire and sent him to A+ where he figured to back up Ramon Cabrera. However Paulino quickly earned more playing time by having a big offensive season and continuing his great defensive work. To keep his bat in the lineup the Pirates even tried Paulino some in LF near the end of the season. It appeared Paulino was in line for a promotion to AA this season but Tony Sanchez repeating the level caused a bit of a log jam and he remained at A+. Unfortunately he regressed at the plate this season and despite posting similar walk and strike out rates hit quite a bit worse. He did show some offensive improvements in the second half but it was still a step backwards from his 2011 season. Despite his poor offense Paulino’s calling card is his defense and that is strong enough that he could make it to the majors one day as a solid backup catcher.

Jacob Stallings: Paulino is a great defensive catcher but he isn’t the best in the organization. That title goes to Stallings who the Pirates drafted as a signability pick in the 7th round of this year’s draft. In his junior season Stallings set an NCAA record for base runners thrown out attempting to steal so that speaks highly of his defensive ability. The Pirates coaches at the A- praised Stallings this season and called him a second pitching coach. Even with the Pirates odd strategy of not having their pitchers hold on runners Stallings managed to throw out 36% of base stealers this season. He is a great game caller and a leader in the clubhouse. For all the positive reviews his glove work receives his bat receives negative marks. Stallings is not strong with the bat. He is not a good contact hitter and has very little power but on the plus side he has shown decent plate discipline, drawing a fair number of walks in college and at the A- level. Stallings is a great catcher to have in the organization as he should be a big help to the Pirates young crop of pitchers but due to his weak bat he isn’t really much of a prospect. Stallings great defense with even just a slight improvement in his bat may very well be enough for him to make it to the majors one day but if so it will likely be as only a backup catcher.

Eric Avilia: The Pirates signed Avilia as a 16 years old out of the Dominican Republic in 2006. He wasn’t a high-profile signing and he spent 3 seasons in the DSL before breaking out in 2009. Avilia had a very strong 2009 showing a lot more power, better plate discipline and better contact skills. He moved to the states the following season and had a strong showing in rookie ball finishing tied for the league lead in HR but on the downside his K rate did jump significantly. At this point Avilia was the Pirates top 3rd base prospect, a good title but one with very little distinction as the Pirates 3B prospects have been very weak outside of Alvarez. The Pirates sent Avilia to A ball in 2011 and well it didn’t go well. On the positive side he did manage to cut back on his strike out rate but that came at the expense of him making essentially any good contact. For the season he hit .216/.275/.289 and only hit 4 home runs. His defense at third base had also seemed to take a step backwards. The Pirates sent him back to A ball as a utility player which appeared to mark the end of his prospect days. Avilia got hurt early in the season and didn’t return to June. After posting solid numbers in June and July Avilia earned a chance to start in August and took off displaying some of that great power he has and showing much better contact. Unfortunately his strike out rate continued to rise and his walk rate dipped. Avilia’s power makes him intriguing but he is running out of time to show not only something else but some consistency.

Drew Maggi: The Pirates drafted Maggi in the 15th round of the 2010 draft and signed him for the overslot amount of 468K. At the time he was drafted Maggi was viewed as a strong OBP guy with good speed and defense but limited power. Maggi was drafted as a shortstop but was considered more of an athlete by scouts meaning they thought he could end up as a middle infielder or a center fielder. He debuted at the A- level and struggled hitting for only 156/257/203 line. The Pirates typically send advanced college players like Maggi to A+ for their first full pro season but due to his struggles in A- they sent Maggi to A ball. Maggi hit decently at the A level showing the great plate discipline but never really did anything to stand out the way the Pirates would surely hoped he would. The Pirates sent Maggi to A+ and there he continued with pretty much the same results, good plate discipline but no power. He is also had more trouble making good contact and saw a jump in his strike out rate. His defense was solid but not spectacular. Despite his struggles the Pirates decided to promote Maggi to AA during the season and there he served primarily as a utility player playing both the middle infield and the outfield. His numbers at AA were even worse. Considering the Pirates pushed him to AA despite not earning it and didn’t give him full time playing time it appears they view him as an organization player at this point still Maggi retains some upside.

Kevin Ross: The Pirates drafted Kevin Ross in the 8th round of the 2012 draft and unlike the other picks in the back half of the top 10 he didn’t appear to be a signability selection. Ross was thought to be a tough sign but he ended up signing for slightly below slot. When drafted Ross was characterized as a solid defensive shortstop with a good arm and power potential but it was believed that as he filled out his size would force him to move from SS to 3B. The Pirates announced him as a shortstop but he didn’t play there at all this seasons instead splitting his time between 2B and 3B. Ross played very sparingly so his numbers have to be taken with a grain of salt but he struggled in his limited appearances. Ross appears to have a relatively high upside as Baseball America rated him the 225th best prospect in this past draft so the Pirates will probably try to see what they got in him. Ross will likely play next season with one of the short season affiliates.

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